Mathematics teacher developers’ views of a demonstration class

Ginger Rhodes, Allyson Hallman-Thrasher, Kyle T Schultz

Abstract


This article examines the professional vision of mathematics teacher developers during a professional development experience that featured observations of a content course for elementary teachers.  The researchers examined whether these mathematics teacher developers viewed the demonstration class as an analysis class, a site for reflection and analysis, or a model class, an example of teaching to be emulated.  Results indicated participants could hold either view and, in some cases, both.  Each view provided opportunities for professional growth, but particular aspects of the experience promoted an analysis class view.


Keywords


demonstration lesson, mathematics education, professional development, professional vision, teacher developers

Full Text:

PDF

References


Ball, D. L., & Cohen, D. K. (1999). Developing practice, developing practitioners: Toward a practice-based theory of professional education. In L. Darling-Hammond & G. Sykes (Eds.), Teaching as the learning profession: Handbook of policy and practice (pp. 3–32). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bass, H. (2005). Mathematics, mathematicians, and mathematics education. Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, 42(4), 417–430.

Castro Superfine, A., & Li, W. (2014). Exploring the mathematical knowledge needed for teaching teachers. Journal of Teacher Education, 65(4) 303–314.

Cochran-Smith, M. (2003). Learning and unlearning: The education of teacher educators. Teaching and Teacher Education, 19, 5–28.

Doer, H. M., & Thompson, T. (2004). Understanding teacher educators and their pre-service teachers through multi-media case studies of practice. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 7, 175–201.

Goodwin, C. (1994). Professional vision. American Anthropologist, 96, 606–633.

Jacobs, V. R., Lamb, L. L. C., & Philipp, R. A. (2010). Professional noticing of children’s mathematical thinking. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 41, 169–202.

Jansen, A., & Spitzer, S. M. (2009). Prospective middle school mathematics teachers’ reflective thinking skills: Descriptions of their students’ thinking and interpretations of their teaching. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 12, 133–151.

John, P. D. (2002). The teacher educator’s experience: Case studies of practical professional knowledge. Teaching and Teacher Education, 18(3), 323–341.

Kilpatrick, J., Swafford, J., & Fidell, B. (Eds), (2001). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Knight, S. L., Lloyd, G. M., Arbaugh, F., Gamson, D., McDonald, S. P., & Nolan, J. (2014). Professional development and practices of teacher educators. Journal of Teacher Education. 65(4), 26–270.

Loucks-Horsley, S., Love, N., Stiles, K., Mundry, S., & Hewson, P. W. (2003). Designing Professional Development for Teacher of Science and Mathematics, (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

Loughran, John. (2014). Professional developing as a teacher educator. Journal of Teacher Education, 65(4) 271–283.

National Science Board. (2007). A national action plan for addressing the needs of the U.S. science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education system. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation. http://www.nsf.gov/nsb/documents/2007/stem_action.pdf.

Sherin, M. G. (2001). Developing a professional vision of classroom events. In T. Wood, B. S. Nelson, & J. Warfield (Eds.), Beyond classical pedagogy: Teaching elementary school mathematics (pp. 75–93). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Sherin, M. G., & van Es, E. A. (2005). Using video to support teachers’ ability to notice classroom interactions. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 3, 475 –491.

Sherin, M. G., & van Es, E. A. (2009). Effects of video club participation on teachers’ professional vision. Journal of Teacher Education, 1, 20–37.

Star, J. R., & Strickland, S. K. (2008). Learning to observe: Using video to improve preservice mathematics teachers’ ability to notice. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 11, 107–125.

Stein, M. K., Smith, M. S., & Silver, E. (1999). The development of professional developers: Learning to assist teachers in new setting in new ways. Harvard Educational Review, 69, 237–269.

Castro Superfine, A., & Li, W. (2014). Exploring the mathematical knowledge needed for teaching teachers. Journal of Teacher Education, 65(4) 303–314.

Sztajn, P., Ball, D. L., & McMahon, T. A. (2006). Designing learning opportunities for mathematics teacher developers. In K. Lynch-Davis & R. L. Rider (Eds.), The work of mathematics teacher educators: Continuing the conversation (Vol. 3, pp. 149–162). San Diego, CA: Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Van der Klink, M., Kools, Q., Avissar, G., White, S., & Tetsuhito, S. (2017). Professional development of teacher educators: what do they do? Findings from an explorative international study. Professional Development in Education, 43, 168–178.

van Es, E. A., & Sherin, M. G. (2002) Learning to notice: Scaffolding new teachers’ interpretations of classroom interactions. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 10, 571-596.

van Es, E. A., & Sherin, M. G. (2008). Mathematics teachers’ ‘‘learning to notice’’ in the context of a video club. Teaching and Teacher Education, 24, 244–276.

van Zoest, L. R., Moore, D.L., & Stockero, S. L. (2006). Transition to teacher educator: A collaborative effort. In K.

Lynch-Davis & R.L. Rider (Eds.), AMTE Monograph 3: The work of mathematics teacher educators: Continuing the conversation (pp. 133-148). San Diego, CA: Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Wallach, T., & Evan, R. (2005). Hearing students: The Complexity of understanding what they are saying, showing, and doing. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 8, 393–417.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.